Cooking Styles

Learn about the following cooking styles. Most species lend themselves to a wide variety of cooking styles and, with a little guidance, seafood is one of the easiest foods to cook - so feel free to experiment....and enjoy! Select a recipe from the list.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Pan-fried Cobia Fillet with Herb Salad

Pan-Frying

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Cobia, sometimes called black kingfish (although unrelated to yellowtail kingfish), is farmed in far north Queensland. It has a layer or fat under the skin, which makes it easier to get the crisp skin that gives pan-fried fish such appeal. A little extra salt on the skin before it goes into the pan also helps crisp the skin and prevent it from sticking.

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Serves 6

6 x 180g pieces cobia fillet, skin on, bones removed
Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
Lemon cheeks, for squeezing and serving

Herb Salad
1 bunch chervil, leaves picked
½ bunch dill, leaves roughly chopped
1 bunch chives, chopped
1 punnet baby red-veined sorrel, snipped (see notes)
1 punnet baby coriander, snipped (see notes)
Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 
Drizzle extra virgin olive oil 

Pat the fish with paper towel to absorb any excess moisture. Sprinkle both sides with salt and pepper, adding extra salt to the skin side.

Heat a frying pan over a high heat, add oil and, when hot, place fish in the pan, skin-side down. Cook for 3-5 minutes, depending on thickness, until skin is crisp and the fish has turned white half way up the sides. Turn fish over, add butter to pan and baste for a minute. Add a squeeze of lemon juice and swirl pan to incorporate it.

Meanwhile make Herb Salad: combine all ingredients and set aside.

Serve fish with a lemon cheek and Herb Salad on the side.

Notes:

Micro or baby herbs and cress, growing in punnets, are available at some greengrocers and online. They keep, refrigerated and loosely covered with a damp cloth, for several days; if unavailable use the smallest leaves on a bunch of herbs or tear larger leaves into small pieces.

 
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