Cooking Styles

Learn about the following cooking styles. Most species lend themselves to a wide variety of cooking styles and, with a little guidance, seafood is one of the easiest foods to cook - so feel free to experiment....and enjoy! Select a recipe from the list.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Raw
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Print

Thai-style Green Curry of Luderick

Curries | Poaching

featured

Green curry, typical of the central plains of Thailand, is probably Australia’s most common Thai dish. Usually quite liquid, hotter and more pungent than other curries, it is well suited to oilier fish such as luderick and to bitter vegetables like apple eggplants.

featured

Serves 4

400g luderick fillets, skin off, bones removed
1 cup coconut cream (see notes)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 cup green curry paste (see notes)
1 tablespoon fish sauce
100g snake beans, cut into 3cm lengths (see notes)
4 apple eggplants, stems discarded, quartered (see notes)
1½ cups coconut milk (see notes)
½ cup water
1 lime
2 kaffir lime leaves, central vein discarded, finely shredded (see notes)
2 small green chillies, finely sliced
A handful Thai basil leaves
Steamed jasmine rice, to serve

Trim fish of bloodline, and cut it into bite-sized chunks.

Reserve 2 tablespoons of coconut cream and heat the remainder with the vegetable oil in a wok over medium heat for 4-5 minutes, until it thickens a little and starts to separate. Add curry paste, stir to combine and cook for about 5 minutes, until paste smells aromatic and a thin layer of oil appears on the surface. Stir in half the fish sauce.

Add beans and apple eggplants and stir well to coat. Reduce heat a little, cover and cook for about 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Increase heat to high, add coconut milk and water and stir well to incorporate. When coconut milk starts to bubble, add fish, stir to combine, cover and remove from heat. Leave to rest for 5 minutes; the fish will just cook through in this time.

Taste, add more fish sauce if desired and a squeeze of lime juice, stir in kaffir lime leaves and chillies. Pour into a serving bowl, garnish with Thai basil and reserved coconut cream and serve with rice.

Notes:

If time permits make your own coconut cream and milk, otherwise use a good brand of coconut milk (such as Ayam) and you should be able to use the thick coconut cream that settles at the top of the can to fry the curry paste. Use a good commercial curry paste such as Simon Johnson’s, Christine Manfield’s or Charmaine Solomon’s; if using an Asian curry paste be aware that it may be stronger and you may need to reduce the quantity by at least half. You can replace apple eggplants (available from Asian grocery stores) or snake beans with other green vegetable such as asparagus, snow peas or green beans. Kaffir lime leaves are available from fruit and vegetable shops; they’re usually joined in pairs, 1 lime leaf equals 1 pair.

 
View Cooking Styles >